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Intense search kicks off to find missing Rocío Andrea

SANTIAGO – Twenty-three year old Rocío Andrea Ormazábal Real is missing since July 19. Before she went missing she was undergoing a technical education at the Catholic University’s Duoc UC institute. An extensive campaign to find her is on.

On early Monday, a young woman was reported missing in Chile. Rocío Andrea Ormazábal Real hasn’t been seen since last week, when she was seen in Quilpé, Valparaíso region. Chile’s police, the Carabineros, have already started an extensive search, together with family and friends who are working the social networks to get information about Rocío Andrea out.

According to the description provided by the family, the woman is 1.63m tall, has white skin and brown dreadlocks. When she was last seen, she wore glasses. Ormazábal Real is a student of heritage restoration at Duoc UC.

The institute helped the search by disseminating information about Rocío Andrea via Facebook. Her family urged anyone with information about her whereabouts to either call 32 2720652 or the Carabineros on 133, 299221006 or 229221019, or contact the Carabineros via email departamento.encargos@carabineros.cl.

Disappearances in Chile

According to the Carabineros, about 15,000 people have disappeared since 2003, translating into an average of 63 cases every day. In addition, the investigations police PDI (Spanish acronym) has registered 22 cases. However, Valeska Suárez, head of the PDI’s missing persons unit, said that 95% of people reappear within the 48 hours.

Óscar Garrido, of the same unit said that many disappeared are frequently people who have abandoned drugs and alcohol rehabilitation programs, or senior citizens who suffer dementia. Until 2017, there were around 15,516 disappearances registered by the authorities. Some of those are living in the streets, or have fled domestic violence, Suárez said.

When someone is reported missing, the police creates a profile and starts a search. But in special cases or when persons remain disappeared for over 48 hours, the PDI posts photographs with detailed information on it’s website, which currently shows 197 pictures.

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